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Glastonbury Tor, England



We know from the priests of the far east that they were able to lift heavy boulders up high mountains with the help of groups of various sounds. The knowledge of the various vibrations in the audio range demonstrates to a scientist of physics that a vibrating and condensed sound field can nullify the power of gravitation. Swedish engineer Olaf Alexanderson wrote about this phenomenon in the publication, Implosion No. 13. The following report is based on observations which were made only 20 years ago in Tibet.

Dr Jarl, of Sweden, studied at Oxford, and became friends with a young Tibetan student. A couple of years later, Dr Jarl made a journey to Egypt for the English Scientific Society where he was seen by a messenger of his Tibetan friend, and urgently requested to come to Tibet to treat a high Lama. After Dr Jarl got the leave he followed the messenger and arrived after a long journey by plane and Yak caravans, at the monastery, where the old Lama and his friend who was now holding a high position were now living.

Dr Jarl stayed there for some time, and because of his friendship with the Tibetans he learned much that other foreigners would otherwise never hear about let alone observe.

One day his friend took him to a place in the neighborhood of the monastery and showed him a sloping meadow surrounded by high cliffs. In one of the rock walls, at a height of about 250 metres was a massive hole which looked like the entrance to a cave. In front of this depression there was a platform on which the monks were building a rock wall. The only access to this platform was from the top of the cliff and the monks lowered themselves down with the help of ropes.

In the middle of the meadow, about 250 metres from the cliff, was a polished slab of rock with a bowl like cavity in the center. The bowl had a diameter of one metre and a depth of 15 centimeters. A block of stone was maneuvred into this cavity by Yak oxen. The block was one meter wide and one and one-half meter long. Then 19 musical instruments were set in an arc of 90 degrees at a distance of 63 meters from the stone slab. The radius of 63 meters was measured out accurately. The musical instruments consisted of 13 drums and six trumpets (Ragdons). Eight drums had a cross-section of one meter, and a length of one and one- half meters. Four drums were medium size with a cross-section of 0.7 meter and a length of one meter. The only small drum had a cross-section of 0.2 meters and a length of 0.3 meters. All the trumpets were the same size. They had a length of 3.12 meters and an opening of 0.3 meters.

The big drums and all the trumpets were fixed on mounts which could be adjusted with staffs in the direction of the slab of stone. The big drums were made of 3mm thick sheet iron, and had a weight of 150 kg. They were built in five sections. All the drums were open at one end, while the other end had a bottom of metal, on which the monks beat with big leather clubs. Behind each instrument was a row of monks. When the stone was in position the monk behind the small drum gave a signal to start the concert. The small drum had a very sharp sound, and could be heard even with the other instruments making a terrible din. All the monks were singing and chanting a prayer, slowly increasing the tempo of this unbelievable noise. During the first four minutes nothing happened, then as the speed of the drumming, and the noise, increased, the big stone block started to rock and sway, and suddenly it took off into the air with an increasing speed in the direction of the platform in front of the cave hole 250 meters high. After three minutes of ascent it landed on the platform.

Continuously they brought new blocks to the meadow, and the monks using this method, transported 5 to 6 blocks per hour on a parabolic flight track approximately 500 meters long and 250 meters high. From time to time a stone split, and the monks moved the split stones away, quite an unbelievable task. Dr Jarl knew about the hurling of the stones. Tibetan experts like Linaver, Spalding and Huc had spoken about, but they had never seen it. So Dr Jarl was the first foreigner to have had the opportunity to witness the remarkable spectacle. Originally he had the opinion that he was the victim of mass-psychosis, but later made two films of the incident. The films show exactly the same things that he had witnessed.

The English Society for which Dr Jarl was working confiscated the films and declared them classified, an action difficult to explain. ญญ-- Henry Kjellson






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